Tag Archives: domestic violence

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Protecting the children of Tanzania and Zanzibar

In 2011, UNICEF commissioned an extensive study of violence against children in Tanzania mainland and Zanzibar revealing alarmingly high levels of physical, emotional and sexual violence against children. In 2014 The Centre for Applied Childhood Youth and Family Research at the University of Huddersfield was commissioned by UNICEF Tanzania to undertake a follow up study exploring the role of Knowledge Attitudes and Practices that give rise to violence against children.

Expertise at Huddersfield

The Centre for Applied Childhood Youth and Family Research has an established international reputation in research concerning violence and abuse against children as well as participatory action research with children and communities.

Developing a deeper understanding to inform policy and programming

The aim of the study was to gain a better understanding of the drivers of violence against children and the possibilities for developing a protective environment for children. The overall purpose of the research is to inform policy and programme development whilst at the same time build capacity at a local level through community engagement.

International collaboration

The study was undertaken between October 2014 and December 2015 in 10 regions across mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar and involved a collaboration with Mzumbe University in Tanzania. A team of 10 researchers from Mzumbe University and 20 community researchers from each of the 10 regions were trained by University of Huddersfield staff to undertake the field work.

Community action research

The research was conducted in two phases. The first phase involved focus groups with children, parents, community leaders and professionals in each region. The second phase involved a community action research process involving a total of 60 research workshops. Action research is a different sort of research. Instead of collecting data, action research involves a process of ‘learning for change’ in which participants critically reflect on their own values and practices in order to consider possibilities for change. In this research, issues and questions emerging from the focus groups were explored further in a participatory appraisal process to map attitudes and practices in the community. Parents and community leaders then engaged in critical reflection and dialogue in response to findings, with a view to exploring possibilities for developing a protective environment for children.

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[Image caption: Adults involved in participatory appraisal of values and practices relating to violence against children]

Giving children and young people a voice

In parallel to the adult community action research groups, participatory research with children and young people aged 11-18 years was undertaken in each area. The voices of children are often overlooked in Tanzania, so in this study emphasis was placed on ensuring children and young people had an opportunity to share their views and experiences of violence.

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[Image caption: Young people working together to map violence in their community]

Policy and programme development

UNICEF along with other NGOs (non-governmental organisations) is working with the government in Tanzania mainland and Zanzibar to improve child protection. In January 2016 two national workshops were facilitated by the University of Huddersfield during which national stakeholders engaged with the findings from the study and discussed implications for policy and programme development. Findings from this study will feed into the next 10 year strategy to reduce violence against children in Tanzania. At the same time emphasis was placed on building capacity at a local level by engaging community members and local stakeholders as research partners and agents of change. Their role is to activate learning and development at a local level to respond to violence against children.

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[Image caption: National stakeholders engaging with research findings]

Future research

A subsequent proposal has been submitted to the Oak Foundation for a study of Healthy Relationships in Adolescence, which is a participatory action research project with young people to develop preventative strategies in response to sexual abuse and exploitation.

This project consolidates the reputation of the Centre for Applied Childhood Youth and Family Research for high quality research in the field of child abuse and exploitation.

For further information contact the project leader:

Professor Barry Percy-Smith
Email: b.percy-smith@hud.ac.uk

Eunice Ma

Serious games helping to combat domestic violence

Researchers and practitioners in the growing area of ‘serious games’ are using video game-based technologies such as virtual and augmented reality – more widely associated with entertainment – in order to make breakthroughs in many aspects of healthcare and education.

Minhua Ma 1

A leader in the field is the University of Huddersfield’s Professor Minhua Eunice Ma (pictured above) who has published a large number of articles and books, including Serious Games and Edutainment Applications and Virtual, Augmented Reality and Serious Games for Healthcare 1, which has contributions from almost 100 global experts and is aimed at healthcare professionals, scientists, researchers and students.

Combating domestic violence in the East Caribbean and the UK

Gaming is often associated with encouraging violence, however a project at the University of Huddersfield will lead to the development of a serious game that aims to prevent violence, by helping to reduce levels of domestic violence, generate empathy and change players’ attitude to domestic abuse. The game will be used as part of a project in both the Eastern Caribbean and the UK.

serious gaming

A team headed by the University of Huddersfield’s Professor Adele Jones – an expert on social work and issues including child protection – includes Professor Minhua Eunice Ma, who has a global reputation in the field of serious games designed to bring about improvements in fields such as healthcare and education.  The inter-disciplinary group has been awarded €400,000 via the European Union’s Delegation to the Eastern Caribbean Research Programme: Towards a Future Free from Domestic Violence.

Minhua Ma, Adele Jones and Gill Kirkman

(Pictured from left: Minhua Eunice Ma, Adele Jones and Gill Kirkman)

This will fund a multi-faceted investigation of domestic violence in the Caribbean countries of Grenada and Barbados. The research will be mirrored in the UK by another member of the team, Gill Kirkman, who is Subject Leader in Social Work at the University’s School of Human and Health Sciences. Also taking part in the project is Reader in Criminal Psychology at the University of Huddersfield Dr Daniel Boduszek.

Data will be used to develop an interactive, role-playing computer game designed to educate and influence attitude change among potential perpetrators of violence while seeking to empower those who are at risk of victimisation.

Professor Ma’s goal for this new project is to use games to change young people’s behaviour and attitudes to domestic violence.

None-in-three

The project has been named None-in-Three, derived from the finding that one-in-three women and girls experience violence in their lives.

SeriousGamesEducation

The University of Huddersfield will implement the project in partnership with the Grenada-based Sweet Water Foundation, which campaigns on child sexual abuse, while Huddersfield’s links with the University of the West Indies will help to ensure that the research outcomes have maximum impact across the region.

When the computer game has been developed it will be piloted among groups of young people in the Caribbean. Its language would be adaptable for different countries, although the basic content would likely remain the same.

For further information contact:

Professor Eunice Ma
Email: m.ma@hud.ac.uk